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Happy Pub Day!

December 1, 2011

Happy Pub Day photoWe at Greenleaf Book Group would like to take a moment to congratulate our authors who have books coming out this December.

 

The Labyrinth Campaign by J. Michael Sweeney

The Shift from One to Many: A Practical Guide to Leadership by Chrismon Nofsinger

Live Like a Window, Work Like a Mirror by Mark Brown

The Frog Whisperer by Jane Atkinson

The New Broadcasting Realities by Ken Lindner

Explosive Growth by Michael Rogol

 

Well done! All your hard work and dedication has paid off, and we’re honored to be partners in your latest and greatest work.

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The Big Bad Book Blog's Link Love

November 18, 2011

Hey all, the Big Bad Book Blog's Link Love weekly post is packing its bags and hitching a ride out of town! We're moving to the Big Bad Newsletter! Don't miss out on our personally cultivated links and hilarious writing—join the newseletter today. Not only will you continue to receive our Link Love, you'll also have access to Greenleaf Book Group's Tip of the Week and our Book Facts & Stats. Subscribe right HERE, right now.

 

In true book nerd fashion, we’ve rounded up our favorite publishing-related links of the week for you! Read on to uncover the best in books this week. If you want to know about these links sooner than Friday afternoon, follow us on Twitter—@GreenleafBookGr.

  • Is banning social networking in the work place a productive tactic? Surveys say more than half of young professionals refuse to work for an organization that prohibits use of social media while at work. All Twitter argues that efficiency is actually increased via Facebook and Twitter through the exchange and discussion of ideas, research, and collaboration.
  • We are all in agreement that the issue of taxing online purchases has seen an inordinate amount of frenetic activity as of late, and the playing field just got more confusing. The Marketplace Fairness Act received Amazon and ABA backing last week. A bipartisan group of ten US senators introduced the online sales tax bill, granting states the authority to compel online retailers to collect sales taxes. Yet the question still stands—which is more fair, the Main Street Fairness Act or the Marketplace Fairness Act?
  • Two of the most ominous questions in the publishing world are how public and academic libraries will be affected by the ebook uprising, and if the two systems should collaborate to bind their interests as one. The set of needs for both systems is vastly different, and raises questions on how the two could possibly work in partnership on questions of acquisitions, collections, and responses to the shifting commercial marketplace. If the kinks get worked out, and libraries start lending ebooks, we are ready to sit tight and watch the drastic change that ebook sales may have coming their way.
  • Author Malcolm Gladwell answers readers’ questions in a New Yorker interview, The Real Genius of Steve Jobs. This transcription takes a very humanistic approach to the legacy of Steve Jobs, answering questions like, “Has anyone suspected that Steve has a personality disorder?” And, “What do you make of the fact that Steve Jobs cried in meetings so often?”
  • Ever wonder what, exactly, an editor can do for you? You may be at the point in your writing where you’ve scrutinized over every detail, spent innumerable hours pouring your soul into the masterpiece that is your novel, and are ready to showcase your work to the world. But believe me, you ain’t done yet. Penguin gives great insight into how an editor can transform your work, from commenting and editing, to strategizing future projects with you.
  • Turns out: The hottest gadget of the year is great for buying things off of Amazon, and that's … about it. Needless to say, the Kindle Fire does not live up to its hype. The Fire lacks a camera, 3G data connectivity, and a slot for removable storage, features that the majority of its competitors are not in short of. We’re glad to see the Fire is such a killer deal, but at this point, we’d rather scrounge up the extra dough for another tablet.
  • Modernist writers have taken Twitter by storm, emphasizing their prose through the “less is more” method. Whether or not you are defined by this minimalist approach, if used correctly, Twitter can be an excellent tool to improve your writing skills by creating expressive, obscure, fragmented statements. Just stay away from the LOLs and OMGs.


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The Big Bad Book Blog's Link Love

October 28, 2011

In true book nerd fashion, we’ve rounded up our favorite publishing-related links of the week for you! Read on to uncover the best in books this week. If you want to know about these links sooner than Friday afternoon, follow us on Twitter—@GreenleafBookGr.

  • A CNN study says Generation X is balanced and happy. As much as generational “stereotypes” can drive us all a little bonkers, this is a nice read considering the wrath Generation X has received over the past decade. 
  • The hottest debate in the publishing world: which are better, ebooks or printed books? Let’s get down to the bottom of this. Regardless of sales, is there really a difference? Apple to oranges, or all the same?
  • Steve Jobs, are you watching us? Kat Bailey seems to think so. Bailey created a Watched by Steve blog tribute. Playful memorial, or fanatic fan?
  • Ebooks are still on the rise, claiming a whopping 116% increase in August. “For the first eight months of 2011, ebook sales increased 144.4%, to $649.2 million, from 18 reporting publishers to the AAP monthly statistics program," wrote Publishers Weekly. "Sales were off by double digits in all trade print segments in the January-August period, although sales in the religion category were up 9% in the year to date at the 22 reporting houses.”
  • Is the Nook Color 2 Launching on November 7? TechCrunch seems to think so. Last year this tablet set the standard for enhanced e-readers with its color LCD screen and Android release, but we’ll see if it can compete with Amazon’s Kindle Fire.
  • Theories debunked! We highly enjoyed the Used Furniture Review article “10 Myths About Bookselling.” Myths include “Bookselling Isn’t a Career,” “Bookselling Is a Low-Stress Job,” and “Bookselling is Dead.”
  • Kobo announces an arm in publishing as it signs e-reader sales deal with UK bookstore chain W H Smith. We give kudos to Kobo for their attempt to compete with Amazon in offering complete publishing services for authors.

 

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The Big Bad Book Blog's Link Love

October 14, 2011

In true book nerd fashion, we’ve rounded up our favorite publishing-related links of the week for you! Read on to uncover the best in books this week. If you want to know about these links sooner than Friday afternoon, follow us on Twitter—@GreenleafBookGr.


  • iPad beware: Budget tablets are stepping up to the plate in 2012 by slashing prices to meet the competitive price point of $200. We’ll see who comes out on top after brands like Velocity Micro and Amazon Kindle drive down their prices.
  • The days of happy endings and forever afters are long gone, says New York Times columnist Maria Tatar. Tatar claims that YA authors are crossing over to the dark side: “The savagery we offer children today is more unforgiving than it once was, and the shadows are rarely banished by comic relief. Instead of stories about children who will not grow up, we have stories about children who struggle to survive.”
  • Do terms like Kindle, iPad, Nook, and Kobo make you go cross-eyed? If you’re interested in learning the basics of ebooks, check out this informative webinar featuring Dana Lynn Smith.
  • The National Book Awards finalist were announced this week—but not without error. Shine was mistakenly named in place of the similar-sounding Chime. Sorry Lauren Myracle, you won’t take the gold for the National Book Award this year, but hey, all publicity is good publicity.
  • Amazon goes sci-fi: This week Amazon announced a new imprint, 47North. The imprint will cater to avid readers of science fiction, fantasy, and horror, publishing original works as well as previously published titles. 47North’s debut will be comprised of fifteen books, including The Mongoliad: Book One
  • Connecticut gets tough with Amazon, pushing back on the online sales tax issue. State officials stand strong on requiring Internet sellers to collect state sales taxes. BusinessWeek states that taxes in Connecticut should have been collected “at least during the month or so when the new law was in effect and Amazon still had affiliations with websites in Connecticut through its Amazon Associates Program. Amazon severed those ties in June.”
  • Apple and Google go head to head as the iPhone 4S and Droid Bionic battle for smartphone dominance. With the 4S stocking up in stores this week, NPR gives us a low down on its specs versus the Bionic’s Android operating system.
  • An Ode to the Bookstore: None of us wants to see the demise of our beloved independent bookshops. While some critics claim that these stores will soon become archaic, others hold to the belief that the soul of bookstores will stand the test of time.

 

  

 

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The Big Bad Book Blog's Link Love

October 7, 2011

In true book nerd fashion, we’ve rounded up our favorite publishing-related links of the week for you! Read on to uncover the best in books this week. If you want to know about these links sooner than Friday afternoon, follow us on Twitter—@GreenleafBookGr.

  • No one likes a boring magician, right? Fast Company interviews “Millionaire Magician” Steve Cohen on his secrets of spellbinding pitches. (Read: His tips are not just for aspiring magicians).
  • Attention people who still use @yahoo and @aol email addresses: Your email’s days might be numbered, says CBS’s BNET. The two former giants were featured in their “10 Big Brands in Big Trouble” article this week.
  • Happy Friday everyone! In honor of the last day of the workweek, Publishers Weekly collected some fun word games. They also have a picture of a cat using a computer. Go.

 

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The Big Bad Book Blog's Link Love

September 30, 2011

In true book nerd fashion, we’ve rounded up our favorite publishing-related links of the week for you! Read on to uncover the best in books this week. If you want to know about these links sooner than Friday afternoon, follow us on Twitter—@GreenleafBookGr.

  • Let’s all welcome yet another digital publishing platform into the marketplace this week. BookRiff, a system that allows consumers and publishers to mix and match content from various sources to create their own book, is set to launch on October 6. Have no fear published authors—all original content owners and contributors are ensured to be paid through BookRiff’s services.
  • Lo’ and behold, the Kindle Fire Android was introduced to the masses on Thursday by Amazon’s CEO Jeff Bezos. For your viewing pleasure, Mashable has embedded the entire 51-minute Amazon Kindle Fire announcement. Will the Kindle Fire give its Apple competitors a run for their money?
  • And just for fun (or not), TechCrunch imagined, "The Future of Books: A Dystopian Timeline," predicting that 2015 will mark "the death of the Mom and Pops. Smaller bookstores will use the real estate to sell coffee and Wi-Fi. Collectable bookstores will still exist in the margins."
  • A new partnership is born: Lulu.com announced on September 27 that it has partnered with the world’s dominating bookseller, Barnes & Noble. “This partnership is another step in our passionate efforts to help Lulu creators reach more readers and sell more books”, says Bob Young, Founder and CEO of Lulu.
  •  If you haven’t already checked it out, take a look this year’s shortlisted books for the Man Booker Prize. Winners of the prize will look forward to a life of worldwide recognition and a place in English literature’s history. Who will take the medal this year?
  •  “I’m listening to the band LCD Soundsystem on an Internet music service called Spotify. Because I’ve updated my Facebook page and because I’ve logged in to Spotify with my Facebook identity, every song I listen to is automatically shared to Facebook. Suddenly, my listening experience isn’t private. It’s public.” Sound scary? Facebook seems to have taken a mind of its own with ‘real-time’ apps. Users beware.
  • Does Autumn make you nostalgic for pencil bags, notebooks, and pep rallies? If so, find a hammock in the cool, fall breeze and get lost in one of NPR’s Autumn reads.
  •  The stakes are rising for LCD readers, and new competitors are quickly finding their way into the market. Keep up with the buzz regarding the next tablet to hit the streets, Kobo’s Vox Android.

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Can't Make it to SXSW? Check out this video of the PubCamp conference!

March 14, 2011

The SXSW PubCamp conference and party took place on Friday, and if you'd like to see what you missed, you can watch the recorded version of the event. The conference was aimed at examining the intersection between readers, writers and technology, and some of the sessions included a Publisher's Weekly panel and speakers from Condé Nast.

At SXSW you can usually expect out-of-the-box talks about new technology, industry changes, and innovative solutions. PubCamp’s content was mostly business-as-usual, though there were some great nuggets of wisdom to be had--it's always good to hear what people are buzzing about. Check out the video yourself and let us know what you think!

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It's a Big, Bad Book World: This Week in Publishing

May 15, 2009
  • Remember Sarah Palin? She got a book deal with HarperCollins. Her memoir, which will cover both the personal and the political, will be co-published for the Christian market by HC-owned publisher Zondervan.
  • Amazon made a couple of moves, optimizing its Kindle store for viewing on the iPhone's Safari browser and unveiling its AmazonEncore program, which will put marketing and distribution muscle behind self-published books that they believe have sales potential.
  • We lost Google for a few terrifying hours.
  • Bloggasm looked at the effect of the free digital release of five Random House books—do free e-copies help or hinder print sales?
  • The UK's Richard & Judy got cancelled, but their popular book club (it's sort of like Oprah's is in the US) may stick around.
  • Smart Bitches covered the International Digital Publishing Forum's Digital Book conference that took place in New York this week. Also, lots of Twitter coverage (naturally) and a PW piece highlighting the importance of women and the romance genre in ereading.

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Toolkit for New Authors: How to Be an Industry Insider

October 12, 2007

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Wouldn't it be nice to pen a brilliant book and have the world instantly adore your genius? It doesn't work that way, of course: "The End" means the beginning of your transformation into an industry-savvy member of the writing community. You'll take away huge benefits if you are aware of the myriad available resources for independent authors like yourself. Here's some advice to help you take advantage of them:

Become a member of guilds and other associations: Don't be a starving artist type, beleaguered with the financial repercussions of your writing profession. That's so cliché. These groups can get you discounts, health benefits, and free stuff:

  • MediaBistro's AvantGuild – As if MediaBistro wasn't resourceful enough, its AvantGuild membership gives you access to a wealth of additional tools. For $49 for a year membership or $78 for two years, you get access to "Pitching an Agent" articles, discounts to writing and publishing courses and workshops, free magazine subscriptions, and even discounts on yoga and acupuncture--you know, stress relief for all of that writing, rewriting, editing, and rejection.
  • Authors Guild – Established in 1912, the Authors Guild provides health insurance, legal services, and advocacy for authors of all types. Dues for the initial year of membership are $90; after that they are calculated by the member's income from writing.
  • PMA, The Independent Book Publishers Association – Dues for membership to this organization start at $160 for non-publishers, and the < title="benefits" href="http://www.pma-online.org/benefits/membenefits.aspx" target="_blank">benefitsinclude (among many others) discounted shipping and ad rates, health and liability insurance, discounted access to Neilsen Bookscan, and participation in Publishing University Online, which offers interactive Web/phone seminars.

Read blogs: There’s a wealth of blogs out there offering news and more with fresh voices and uncensored opinions. By reading a sampling of these, you'll have a finger on the pulse of the book biz, catching the latest trends, news stories, and advice. Explore the book blogosphere and navigate blogrolls to find something you like. Some of our favorites:

  • MediaBistro's GalleyCat – The self-described "First Word on the Book Publishing Industry," GalleyCat blogs all day about industry happenings, authors, and the scandals that occasionally arise in the industry.
  • Book Slut – Interested in hearing what literary luminaries, agents, and editors have to say? Book Slut interviews some of the latest, greatest minds in literature and publishing and posts the interviews for all to read.
  • Grumpy Old Book Man – Is publishing a very friendly business? That's the title of a post by the Grumpy Old Book Man, an English writer who blogs about his experiences in the industry.
  • The Millions – Blogger C. Max Magee and a host of contributors have kept The Millions up-to-date for well over four years, making this site respectably middle aged in blog years. Bibliophiles will salivate over entries like "Hard to Pronounce Literary Names Redux" and "Pagination Blues."

And if you think you’re addicted to coffee, just wait until you get hooked on a morning injection of publishing news via a daily email. Sign up for Shelf Awareness and PW Daily to ensure you’re in the know.

Know how to find an agent: If you're going through an agent, you're surely tired of boilerplate responses from literary agents that "regret to inform you that unsolicited manuscripts are not reviewed." Try here:

  • Litmatch – Like eHarmony for unpartnered authors, Litmatch not only provides comprehensive profiles but will list agents looking for books just like yours!
  • AgentQuery – Another database, but also features a conference listing and MySpace-like author/agent networking site.
  • Everyone Who's Anyone in Adult Trade Publishing – A long list of literary agents, interspersed with the compiler’s eccentric but often illuminating correspondence with them as he tries to find representation.

Become a regular at a relevant forum: Online forums are a great way to network and learn from the successes—and harrowing failures—of your fellow authors. Don’t be a lurker, flamer, or troll. Be active, make connections, and get the inside scoop on a wide range of industry topics with these communities. And don't forget to take what you read on message boards with a grain of salt. You may run into a crazy or two.

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